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Course Syllabus – Programming Concepts C

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Course Syllabus

Course Title:

CNT 2711

Course Number:

Programming Concepts – C

Instructors Name:

Walter Wimberly

Date:

Spring 2002

Credit/Clock Hours:

Clock Hours

4.0 ý Credit Hours

Course Length:

11 weeks

Course Schedule:

Monday/Wednesday

Unit of Academic Measurement:

ý Quarter
System

Prerequisites:

None

Corequisites:

None

(Check one)

Required

Optional

Textbook (s)

An Introduction to Programming with C++ Second Edition

ý

Resources & Supplies

6 Floppy disk

3 different color Highlighter

1 Notebook/folder

 

ý

ý

ý

 

Course Description:

This course is designed to show students the basics
of programming using the C programming language. Student will be asked
to write a number of short but functional programs and scripts that can
be used later to create larger more functional programs.

 

 

Performance Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

ü

Know basic C commands

ü

Know how to create and assign values to variables

ü

Know how to write functions in C

ü

Follow the basic structure of creating a C Program

Instructional Methods:

This course will use lecture, hands on labs, presentations, group
discussion, textbook reading, and case studies.

Grading:

Student performance will be evaluated based upon the following
criteria.

Class Participation.. 10%

Quizzes …………… 30%

Homework………… 30%

Major Projects……. 30%

100 – 90 = A

89 – 80 = B

79 – 70 = C

69 – 60 = D

00 – 59 = F

Library Assignments:

As needed for class projects and for the class lecture which each
student shall lead.

Course Policies:

Attendance:

Because much of the course work will be assigned and
completed in class at the computer, your attendance is essential, and your
participation grade will be based on the percentage of time you have
attended class and how effectively you utilize class time when in
attendance. Call me for any reason whatsoever, but especially if you have
a problem you need to discuss please contact me at the school 407-857-2300
or by e-mail at wwimberly@iadt.edu. No concern is "too small to
call". You are responsible for finding out what you missed in
class if you are absent.

Make-up Work:

1. Class Participation cannot be made up.

2. Assignments (test, projects, homework, etc.)
will not be accepted after three weeks from the due date regardless of
reason.

3. Some assignments, at instructor’s discretion,
may not be allowed to be made up at all regardless of the absence
being excused or unexcused.

4. An assignment is considered late if the
instructor does not receive it when the instructor calls it for. The
time that the instructor calls for it is left up to the discretion of
the instructor. After this point the assignment is considered one week
late.

5. Assignments are considered two and three weeks
late at their respective time when in the subsequent weeks the
instructor calls for any assignments and they are not received.

6. In the case where that particular type of
assignment is not issued on a per week basis, then the assignment is
late when any assignment is collected for that class. If no assignment
is collected for that class then the assignment is an extra week late
after the instructor begins the class instruction time.

7. Assignments may be turned in prior to the next
class, but only after the assignment is originally due, to the
receptionist or the instructor to avoid additional late penalty.

8. If an absence is excused and the assignment can
be made up, the late penalty will be 10% per week, before normal
grading occurs (also referred to as "off the top").

9. If an absence is unexcused and the assignment can be made up,
the late penalty will be 20% per week, before normal grading occurs
(also referred to as "off the top").

Other:

Proper use of computers:
Computers may only be used for relevant and proper class work during class
time. Improper usage includes, but is not limited to: Surfing the Web,
Checking E-Mail, Doing other Class Work (other than what is assigned)
during class. Offensive material is improper at anytime. This includes but
is not limited to: pornography, racial/hate material, and material that
includes and promotes violence.

 

Academic Dishonesty: Academic dishonest includes,
but is not limited to: cheating, helping others cheat, copying work, and
plagiarism. Those caught under the rules of Academic Dishonesty will be
punished. Minimum punishment guidelines are found in the Student Handbook.
For this class, first offence of any magnitude results in a negative 100%
for the grade on which the assignment that was affected. Second offence
results in a meeting with the Dean for punishment indicative of the
Student Handbook, which can include dismissal from the school.

 

Professional Behavior: As students, training to
become professionals, you should attempt to "carry" yourself as
such. View each person as a potential client/boss whom you would like to
impress. In as such, proper language should be used at all times, as
should proper respect to all individuals involved. This includes arriving
at class on time and to use the time thoughtfully and wisely not only for
yourself, but for those around you as well.

 

 

Topical Outline

Topic

Description of Content

Approximate Percentage 

of Class Time Allocated

to Each Topic

Programming Logic

Program Flow control

Problem Analysis

20%

Basic C Commands

Creating variables

Assignment of values to variables

Decision Blocks

Looping structures

60%

Advanced C

Structs

Arrays

Pointers

20%

TOTAL

100%

 

 

 

CLASS MEETING OUTLINE

Programming Concepts – C

Week:

Reading:

Quizzes:

1

Cover Syllabus

Tutorial 1 – Introduction to Control Structures

Tutorial 2 – The Problem Solving Process

 

2

Working with Visual C++ 6.0 (the compiler)

Tutorial 3 – Problem Solving and Getting Started with C++

 

3

Tutorial 4 – Variables, Constants, Arithmetic Operators, and
Assignment Statements

Quiz Tutorials 1 – 3

4

Tutorial 4 – Variables, Constants, Arithmetic Operators, and
Assignment Statements

 

5

Tutorial 5 -Built-In Functions

 

6

Tutorial 6 – Program Defined Value Returning Functions

Quiz Tutorials 4 -5

7

Tutorial 7 – Program Defined Void Functions

 

8

Tutorial 8 – The Selection Structure

Quiz Tutorials 6 – 7

9

Tutorial 9 – More on the Selection Structure

 

10

Tutorial 10 – The Repetition Structure

 

11

Final Week

Quiz Tutorials 8 – 10

The instructor reserves the right to make changes to the syllabus at any
time.

Pop Quizzes may be assigned at any time, and may not be made up.

 


Copyright ©2001-2002, Walter Wimberly – Instructor and all
’round Cool Guy – IADT